ANC National Executive Committee (NEC) Announced

As the African National Congress (ANC) wraps up its 54th National Conference in Johannesburg, it has announced the new members of its National Executive Committee (NEC).

The NEC is the chief executive body of the ANC, South Africa’s ruling party. It has the power to lead the organization, subject to the provisions of its Constitution. It is elected every five years, at the party’s National Conference. The NEC, in turn, elects a National Working Committee, which is responsible for day-to-day decision-making.

The NEC is composed of The President, Deputy President, National Chairperson, the Secretary General, Deputy Secretary General and the Treasurer General, who are separately by the National Conference, and commonly referred to as the “Top 6”, as well as 80 additional members.

The Top 6 positions are now filled by the following newly-elected members:

President: Cyril Ramaphosa
Deputy President: David Mabuza
National Chairperson: Gwede Mantashe
Secretary General: Ace Magashule
Deputy Secretary General: Jessie Duarte
Treasurer General: Paul Mashatile

Cyril Ramaphosa, the new leader of the ANC, does not have a majority of allies in the NEC. If this translates to a lack of support from a majority of the NEC voting members, it may limit the scope of control he has over the party, and his ability to drive policy changes. While Ramaphosa has replaced Jacob Zuma as the party’s President, Zuma is still the President of the country, with his term ending at the time of the next South African general election sometime in 2019.

The two main party leaders that Ramaphosa will be leading the ANC against in said election will be Mmusi Maimane of the Democratic Alliance, and Julius Malema of the Economic Freedom Fighters. Both parties are looking to increase the gains they saw during the 2014 general election, and potentially form a coalition government that will unseat the ANC for the first time since they began leading the country in 1994.

Pravin Gordhan, the previous South African Minister of Finance, replaced by President Zuma during a cabinet reshuffle in March 2017, has been elected as a member of the new NEC.

Among the elected NEC members are Ramaphosa’s opponent in the ANC leadership election, Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma (receiving the 9th most votes), Finance Minister Malusi Gigaba, and former central bank Governor Tito Mboweni. Former ANC Treasurer-General Zweli Mkhize won the most votes of the 80 additional members of the NEC, followed by Lindiwe Zulu, the Minister of Small Business Development.

Staunch backers of Ramaphosa in the NEC include Pravin Gordhan, Derek Hanekom, Angie and Mathole Motshekga, Jackson Mthembu and Mondli Gungubele.

Among the backers of President Jacob Zuma in the NEC are omvula Mokonyane, Collen Maine, Bathabile Dlamini, Pule Mabe and Tony Yengeni.

ANC leaders who did not retain positions in the NEC include SACP leader Blade Nzimande, and Ministers Thulas Nxesi, Gugile Nkwinti, and Senzeni Zokwana.

The new members of the NEC, in no particular order, are as follows:

  1. Zweli Mkhize
  2. Lindiwe Zulu
  3. Regina Makgaule
  4. David Masondo
  5. Malusi Gigaba
  6. Ronald Lamola
  7. Violet Siwela
  8. Zizi Kodwa
  9. Nkosazana Dlamini-Zuma
  10. 1Obed Bapela
  11. Tito Mboweni
  12. Lindiwe Sisulu
  13. Bheki Cele
  14. Fikile Mbalula
  15. Thoko Didiza
  16. Sdumo Dlamini
  17. Bathabile Dlamini
  18. Senzo Mchunu
  19. Pravin Gordhan
  20. Naledi Pandor
  21. Ivan Botes
  22. Zingiswa Losi
  23. Jackson Mthembu
  24. Phumulo Masualle
  25. Pule Mabe
  26. Sfiso Buthelezi
  27. Mduduzi Manana
  28. Aaron Motsoaledi
  29. Thandi Modise
  30. Edna Molewa
  31. Collen Maine
  32. Nathi Mthethwa
  33. Tima Joemat Pieterson
  34. Nkenke Kekana
  35. Maite Nkoana-Mashabane
  36. Angie Motshekga
  37. Bongani Bongo
  38. Enoch Godongwana
  39. Nomvula Mokonyane
  40. Baleka Mbete
  41. Derrick Hanekom
  42. Mondli Gungubele
  43. Jeff Radebe
  44. David Mahlobo
  45. Ruth Bhengu
  46. Msebenzi Zwane
  47. Pinky Kekana
  48. Nocawe Mafu
  49. Joe Maswanganyi
  50. Tony Yengeni
  51. Joel Netshitenzhe
  52. Dakota Lekgoete
  53. Nosiviwe Mapisa-Nqakula
  54. Noxolo Kiviet
  55. Ngoako Ramathlodi
  56. Mathole Motshekga
  57. Sbongile Bhesane
  58. Thandi Mahambehlala
  59. Susan Shabangu
  60. Pinky Moloi
  61. Beauty Dluelane
  62. Pamela Tshwete
  63. Toko Xasa
  64. Dipuo Letsatsi-Duba
  65. Dikeledi Magadzi
  66. Thabang Makwetla
  67. Siyabonga Cwele
  68. Barbrah Creecy
  69. Mildred Oliphant
  70. Khensani Khubayi
  71. Nomaindia Mfeketho
  72. Hlengiwe Mkhize
  73. Pemmy Majodina
  74. Faith Mothambi
  75. Rejoice Mabudavhasi
  76. Cindy Tshikunga
  77. Gwen Ramokgopa
  78. Sylvia Lucas
  79. Pammy Majodina
  80. Candith Mashego

Many South Africans, as well as those overseas, are skeptical as to the direction that the newly-elected party members will take the country in the coming months, with the hope that South Africa will see less corruption and greater economic growth in its near future. There is also something to be said of the ever-present need for all parties in Parliament to come together and make decisions which will benefit citizens as a whole, as opposed to wasting precious discussion time on the often racism-fueled volleys that the country’s residents have come to know.

To learn more about the ANC’s National Executive Committee, click here.

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Sources: [1], [2], [3], [4], [5], [6]. Image Sources: [1], [2].